Aristotle – the Ethics of Happiness

Author: Julian Scott

February 7, 2017

One of Aristotle’s most famous works is his Nicomachean Ethics, so called because the work was edited by Aristotle’s son Nicomachus. It is a curious fact that none of Aristotle’s surviving works were directly written by him. They are all compilations from his lecture notes, edited by his various students. This accounts for their often [...]

Living in a One-Dimensional World

Author: Istvan Orban

February 7, 2017

Ken Loach’s latest film – I, Daniel Blake – has received mixed reviews and has given rise to a lot of debate. One of the key elements of the film is how the benefits system in the UK places people in a humiliating and depressing situation, where they are no longer individuals but just claimants, [...]

John Dee – Magician, Mathematician and Angelologist

Author: Julian Scott

November 12, 2016

Earlier this year a remarkable exhibition was shown at the Royal College of Physicians in Regent’s Park, London: Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee. Born in 1527, of Welsh ancestry, John Dee was one of Tudor England’s most extraordinary and enigmatic figures. A brilliant mathematician, he was offered the chair of mathematics [...]

Initiation and Shamanism

Author: Istvan Orban

August 22, 2016

According to Mircea Eliade, the philosopher and historian of religion, shamanism is a technique of religious ecstasy. The word shaman is probably derived from the Tungusic root saman, which means ‘knowing’. What does the shaman know? Basically, shamans are priests, medicine men, singers, dancers, drummers, and they have many other skills as well; but what [...]

At the service of philosophy – Manly P. Hall’s life and teachings

Author: Agostino Dominici

June 13, 2016

A few years ago, while browsing on YouTube, I happened to stumble across some old recordings of lectures covering an array of metaphysical and mystical topics. I was quickly taken by the depth and breadth with which the speaker, effortlessly, delivered his talks. Soon I learned that the person behind those words was a very [...]

Is Morality Relative?

Author: Julian Scott

May 17, 2016

This is one of those philosophical questions that will probably always exist. There are no doubt many possible answers, but perhaps the best place to start is with the philosophy of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804). Kant’s position on this question was unequivocal. In a world of relativities, there is only one thing that can be considered [...]

The Eco-Philosophy of Henryk Skolimowski

Author: Istvan Orban

December 27, 2015

The World is a Sanctuary – according to Henryk Skolimowski, a contemporary Polish philosopher regarded as the father of eco-philosophy – and not a Machine, as Newton proclaimed. Skolimowski studied at Oxford, where he received his PhD, then went on to teach philosophy for many years in the United States. Skolimowski’s eco-philosophy goes against the [...]

In Conversation with Geshe Lhakdor

Author: Yaron Barzilay

October 7, 2015

During their grueling journey across the Himalayas, Tibetan refugees carried hundreds of manuscripts into India, often guarding them with their lives. Many of these precious texts were offered to His Holiness the Dalai Lama, who founded the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala (India), dedicated to preserve and promote the Tibetan heritage. Today [...]

Rumi: The Mystic

Author: Bhavna Roy

January 30, 2015

Eight centuries ago a culture of mystical Islam suffused the lands extending from modern day Turkey (Anatolia) to modern day Afghanistan and Iran (Khorasan); it was called Sufi Islam. Etymologically, the word ‘Sufi’ is derived from the Arabic word safa, meaning purity. Mystics of the order created a path towards attaining self-knowledge and god-realisation in [...]

Confucius

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

The philosopher who has had most influence on the Chinese people is known in the history of thought by the name of K’ung-fu-tzu, or Master K’ung, which the Jesuit missionaries of Peking latinized to Confucius. According to tradition, K’ung Chung-ni, or K’ung Ch’iu was born in Ch’ü-fu in the State of Lu, on the 21st [...]

Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

But to the public in general and the readers of the Secret Doctrine I may repeat what I have stated all along, and which I now clothe in the words of Montaigne: Gentlemen: “I have here made only a nosegay of culled flowers, and have brought nothing of my own but the string that ties [...]

Nicholas of Cusa

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

Nicholas Cryfts – or Krebs – was born in Kues (Cusa), on the banks of the River Moselle, in the region of Trier, now Germany, in 1401. His father, Johan Cryfts, a rich ship owner, died in 1451 and his mother, Catherina Roemer, in 1427. His early education took place at the school of the [...]