In Conversation with Geshe Lhakdor

Author: Yaron Barzilay

October 7, 2015

During their grueling journey across the Himalayas, Tibetan refugees carried hundreds of manuscripts into India, often guarding them with their lives. Many of these precious texts were offered to His Holiness the Dalai Lama, who founded the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala (India), dedicated to preserve and promote the Tibetan heritage. Today [...]

Let’s Listen Then In Conversation with Shabnam Virmani

Author: Manjula Nanavati

July 19, 2015

Shabnam Virmani is the founder of the Kabir Project, which consists of a series of ongoing journeys inquiring into the spiritual, cultural, and socio-political resonances of the 15th century mystic and poet Kabir. Housed at the Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology (Bengaluru), the Kabir Project team has worked with this music and poetry [...]

Rumi: The Mystic

Author: Bhavna Roy

January 30, 2015

Eight centuries ago a culture of mystical Islam suffused the lands extending from modern day Turkey (Anatolia) to modern day Afghanistan and Iran (Khorasan); it was called Sufi Islam. Etymologically, the word ‘Sufi’ is derived from the Arabic word safa, meaning purity. Mystics of the order created a path towards attaining self-knowledge and god-realisation in [...]

Confucius

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

The philosopher who has had most influence on the Chinese people is known in the history of thought by the name of K’ung-fu-tzu, or Master K’ung, which the Jesuit missionaries of Peking latinized to Confucius. According to tradition, K’ung Chung-ni, or K’ung Ch’iu was born in Ch’ü-fu in the State of Lu, on the 21st [...]

Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

But to the public in general and the readers of the Secret Doctrine I may repeat what I have stated all along, and which I now clothe in the words of Montaigne: Gentlemen: “I have here made only a nosegay of culled flowers, and have brought nothing of my own but the string that ties [...]

Nicholas of Cusa

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

Nicholas Cryfts – or Krebs – was born in Kues (Cusa), on the banks of the River Moselle, in the region of Trier, now Germany, in 1401. His father, Johan Cryfts, a rich ship owner, died in 1451 and his mother, Catherina Roemer, in 1427. His early education took place at the school of the [...]

Plato

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

The son of Ariston and a descendant of King Codrus and Perictione, who was a descendant of the great lawgiver, Solon, he was born in Athens in 429/28 B.C. and died in 347 B.C. His real name was in fact Aristocles and Plato was a nickname that means “broad-shouldered”. It was apparently given to him [...]

Plethon

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

He was born between 1355 and 1360 in Constantinople. Although we have no definite information about his family or origins, the various authors who have researched the subject believe that he was born into a well-to-do family, probably of an orthodox priestly origin, so it is logical to suppose that he received a complete education [...]

Saint Augustine

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

Aurelius Augustinus was born in the city of Tagaste (Numidia), in the year 354 A.D. His mother, a devoted Christian later to be known as St. Monica, tried to instill the faith in him from an early age, which the young Augustine resisted, considering it to be intellectually confused. His family invested a large part [...]

Socrates

Author: Anonymous

August 8, 2014

The greatest of the philosophers was born in Alopeka, a town in Attica in the year 470 B.C. His father, Sophroniscus, was a sculptor and his mother, Phaenarete, a midwife – a profession to which Socrates often alluded, comparing it to his philosophical method, mayeutics (from the Greek maieuo, to cause to be born). He [...]

Aristotle

Author: Anonymous

August 7, 2014

We owe to the Greek historian Diogenes Laertius most of our information on the life and works of this philosopher, who, together with Socrates and Plato, symbolize Western philosophical inquiry. He was born in 384 B.C. in Stagira (Thrace) and died in Chalcis (Euboea) in 322 B.C. His father, Nicomachus, was physician to Amyntas, the [...]

The Occult Philosophy in the English Renaissance

Author: Julian Scott

August 5, 2014

The official history we learn at school or read in most books gives us only a partial view of reality and leaves out things that do not fit into the prevailing view. A case in point is the English Renaissance and its links with occultism. The standard history of that age tells us of the [...]